A mission > no mission!

KONY 2012 ll watch this now if you haven’t done so already.

Tags: KONY 2012
boston:

How Boston City Hall was born
- Architects worldwide have declared Boston’s City Hall one of the greatest buildings of the 20th century. Fifty years after a groundbreaking competition, two architects look back at the project that polarized the city - and gave it a new lease on life.

And my first thought at the sight of the building was… “Oh my! It looks exactly like Shumen’s city hall!”

boston:

How Boston City Hall was born

- Architects worldwide have declared Boston’s City Hall one of the greatest buildings of the 20th century. Fifty years after a groundbreaking competition, two architects look back at the project that polarized the city - and gave it a new lease on life.

And my first thought at the sight of the building was… “Oh my! It looks exactly like Shumen’s city hall!”

Reblogged from boston.tumblr.com
boston:

EDITORIAL
Puffins: It’s better in Bermuda
- The National Audubon Society’s Project Puffin, which has been restoring puffins to Maine islands since the 1970s, put geolocators on eight birds. One of those bird’s journey was nothing short of amazing.

boston:

EDITORIAL

Puffins: It’s better in Bermuda

- The National Audubon Society’s Project Puffin, which has been restoring puffins to Maine islands since the 1970s, put geolocators on eight birds. One of those bird’s journey was nothing short of amazing.

Reblogged from boston.tumblr.com
washingtonpoststyle:

On Valentines Day in 1884, Teddy Roosevelt’s wife and mother died within hours of each other. This was his diary entry for that Thursday.
via LettersOfNote by way of Gene Weingarten.

washingtonpoststyle:

On Valentines Day in 1884, Teddy Roosevelt’s wife and mother died within hours of each other. This was his diary entry for that Thursday.

via LettersOfNote by way of Gene Weingarten.

Reblogged from NPR
theatlantic:

Adulthood, Delayed: What Has the Recession Done to Millennials?

Generations are social constructs. There is no chemical or biological difference between Gen-Xers and Millennials, but we talk about them as if they were different species. That Gen-Xers grew up “independent” and Millennials grew up “entitled” aren’t anthropological observations. Rather, they’re marginally useful stereotypes. If it’s true that members of a certain age group have commonalities that they don’t fully share with older or younger groups, this isn’t the result of generational determinism. It’s just circumstance.
The circumstances surrounding the Millennial generation are particularly strange. Many came of age in the longest economic expansion of the 20th century and graduated into the worst recession since the 1930s. The abrupt contraction of opportunity has left a mark. Unemployment among 18- to 24-year-olds was 16% in 2011, twice as high as the national average. Median earnings fell more for the young than any other cohort, and college debt, most of which is held by 20-somethings, is at an all-time high.
With education comes opportunity. That’s the deal, as this generation understood it. Now, they’re the highest-educated generation in American history, and they’ve graduated into … this.
When adults wonder what’s the matter with the Millennial generation that has increasingly chosen to live with their parents and put off marriage and homeownership, the first thing to say is that they’re using the word “chosen” wrong. Nobody chose this. The economy chose for them.
Read more. [Image: Scarleth White/Flickr]

theatlantic:

Adulthood, Delayed: What Has the Recession Done to Millennials?

Generations are social constructs. There is no chemical or biological difference between Gen-Xers and Millennials, but we talk about them as if they were different species. That Gen-Xers grew up “independent” and Millennials grew up “entitled” aren’t anthropological observations. Rather, they’re marginally useful stereotypes. If it’s true that members of a certain age group have commonalities that they don’t fully share with older or younger groups, this isn’t the result of generational determinism. It’s just circumstance.

The circumstances surrounding the Millennial generation are particularly strange. Many came of age in the longest economic expansion of the 20th century and graduated into the worst recession since the 1930s. The abrupt contraction of opportunity has left a mark. Unemployment among 18- to 24-year-olds was 16% in 2011, twice as high as the national average. Median earnings fell more for the young than any other cohort, and college debt, most of which is held by 20-somethings, is at an all-time high.

With education comes opportunity. That’s the deal, as this generation understood it. Now, they’re the highest-educated generation in American history, and they’ve graduated into … this.

When adults wonder what’s the matter with the Millennial generation that has increasingly chosen to live with their parents and put off marriage and homeownership, the first thing to say is that they’re using the word “chosen” wrong. Nobody chose this. The economy chose for them.

Read more. [Image: Scarleth White/Flickr]

Reblogged from NPR